Depicting the Nature of Female Sex Trafficking in Modern Nigeria through Film: A Critique of Nollywood’s Òlòturé

  • Patricia E. Enerst - Onuiri Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Margaret Solo - Anaeto Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria
  • Omolayo O. Jegede Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo, Ogun State, Nigeria

Abstract

Cases of female sex trafficking continues to be on the rise in Nigeria. It is a form of modern slavery that strips victims of their fundamental human rights in a manner that is considered inhumane. Victims are subject to various levels of abuse such as sexual violence and which often affect their psychological wellbeing. Victims of female sex trafficking are either abducted or deceived into subscribing for a travel opportunity abroad in search of a better life.  The media is recognized as a channel through which social issues such as human trafficking is addressed in society and film have become a major platform for mirroring the nature of the occurrence of these issues presented for education and advocacy through entertainment.  The Nigerian film industry (Nollywood) have produced several films on trafficking, however this study seeks to critically analyze the use of language, tone, and the treatment of salient issues presented in the movie Òlòturé. This movie is purposively selected for this study because it is recent (2020 release), focuses on female sex trafficking among sex workers otherwise called prostitutes which presents a novelty in the portrayal of the subject matter through film.


Keywords: Sexual violence, female sex trafficking, Rape, Òlòturé

Published
2021-07-25
How to Cite
ONUIRI, Patricia E. Enerst -; ANAETO, Margaret Solo -; JEGEDE, Omolayo O.. Depicting the Nature of Female Sex Trafficking in Modern Nigeria through Film: A Critique of Nollywood’s Òlòturé. KIU Journal of Social Sciences, [S.l.], v. 7, n. 2, p. 165-170, july 2021. ISSN 2519-0474. Available at: <https://www.ijhumas.com/ojs/index.php/kiujoss/article/view/1235>. Date accessed: 25 sep. 2021.